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Resources

See below for answers to common questions

How do I check for insurance coverage through The Lactation Network?

  1. Verify if your plan is supported through The Lactation Network by completing the form found at The Lactation Network to request an appointment with Wellspring Lactation

  2. Once the form has been submitted the team at The Lactation Network will review your claim and provide an emailed response within one business day

  3. One of our Wellspring Lactation Consultants will reach out to you to schedule

  4. If The Lactation Network approves your claim your cost for the consult will be covered (excluding any travel charges).

  • If it is not covered we offer a Superbill so you can present this to your insurance provider for reimbursement

Preparing for an
In-Home Consult

Try to plan so your baby will be willing to eat for the consult but make sure your baby won’t be too hungry because baby may be too fussy.  Arrange for someone to help with other children or pets.  Have feeding items, pump, and pump parts available if needed.  A support person is welcome to join the consult.  It is nice to have another person there to help remember tips.  They can also learn how to support you more.

Preparing for a Virtual Consult

Find a comfortable place with good lighting and a good internet connection. Try to plan so your baby will be willing to eat for the consult but make sure your baby won’t be too hungry because baby may be too fussy.  Arrange for someone to help with other children or pets. Have feeding items, pump, and pump parts available if needed.  A support person is welcome to join the consult.  It is nice to have another person there to adjust the camera and help remember tips.  They can also learn how to support you more.

When should I see a Lactation Consultant?

See a lactation consultant (IBCLC-International Board-Certified Lactation Consultant) if you are having pain, concerned about your milk supply, or concerned about how your baby is latching, breastfeeding, or gaining weight.

How do I know when my baby is hungry?

Babies show us signs called feeding cues when they are ready to eat such as, opening mouth widely “rooting”, sucking on hands, sticking tongue out, sucking motions, or turning towards anything that nears the mouth.  Crying is a late sign of hunger.  Try to feed your baby when showing early cues as this helps with latching.  Sometimes babies will suck on their hands when they are trying to soothe themselves, although they may not be hungry.  Try burping, walking, rocking, and swaying to try to soothe.  If they continue to suck on their hand, then feed again.

How do I know if my baby is getting enough to eat?

Your baby, should be getting the recommended daily amounts of wet and stooled diapers, showing that "what goes in, comes out". 

 

You should be hearing frequent swallowing while breastfeeding.  Your breasts should feel fuller before the feeding and softer afterward.  Your baby should be content after the feeding.  If your baby is nursing longer than 40 minutes routinely or appears to have low energy, then follow up with a lactation consultant.

https://kellymom.com/bf/got-milk/supply-worries/enough-milk/

How much weight should my baby be gaining?

Babies usually lose weight in the first few days (sometimes up to 8-10%). 

They start to gain weight starting on day 3-5.  They typically regain their birth weight by 10-14 days.  Feeding 8 or more feedings in 24 hours with any feeding cues will help prevent high weight loss.  After day 5, typical weight gain should be about 5-7 oz. per week (20-30 grams/day or ¾ oz.-1oz/day).

What is colostrum?

What is colostrum?  Colostrum is the first milk, and it is produced as early as 20 weeks of pregnancy.  Colostrum is often called “liquid gold” and is usually yellow or clear in color.  It is very thick and in the first 3 days, baby only needs a few drops to a teaspoon (about 5mls).  Colostrum contains antibodies and protects against infection.  It lines the stomach and intestines and protects from invading organisms.  The frequent removal of colostrum during breastfeeding, hand expression, and pumping leads to additional milk production.

When should my milk come in?

When you are about 20 weeks pregnant, your breasts have the first milk called colostrum ready.  When your breasts are stimulated, and colostrum is removed, it tells your body to make more colostrum and then make the next milk.  This next milk, transitional milk, typically comes in between 3-5 days after your baby is born. As a result, your breasts will feel fuller, heavier, and often larger.  At this time, you will hear your baby swallowing more frequently, and your baby’s stools will change to look a little like mustard cottage cheese (yellow, seedy).